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Saving children from sex slavery icon-flower

Our vision is to see sex slavery abolished and the broken lives of survivors restored through creating awareness, empowering advocacy, and building partnerships for the prevention, rescue, and restoration of trafficked children in Bali and throughout Indonesia.


Prevention

Prevention

Education and awareness are components of protecting children from becoming victims of sex trafficking. Trafficking is a largely unspoken and unknown problem in Indonesia, and prevention strategies are critical.

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Intervention

Intervention

When children are in exploitative situations, rescue is necessary. This part of combating sex trafficking requires the engagement of local law enforcement and government structures to physically remove children from danger.

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Rehabilitation

Rehabilitation

After rescue, the long road of recovery begins for a child victim of sex trafficking. Quality aftercare is holistic and involves education, trauma counseling, medical care, repatriation, job training and is individualized for each child.

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"Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere" - Martin Luther King Jr.

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Covid-19: Find out what Dark Bali is doing in response to COVID-19 and how you can help provide emergency food and supplies to sex trafficking victims and sex workers in Indonesia’s red light districts. Learn More >

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The Ugly Reality of Human Trafficking in Bali

For many vacationers, the sun-kissed paradise of Bali represents a lush Eden — a heaven on earth. For many of Indonesia’s children, however, this island has become a living hell. It is estimated that as many as 70,000 – 80,000 Indonesian children are victims of prostitution and trafficking, with a large percentage of them enslaved in sex tourism industries around the country – particularly in Bali, Batam, and Jakarta.

Conditions That Create Desperation

While the economy of Bali is booming from tourism, Indonesians from impoverished areas on less thriving islands are seeking better education and job opportunities. Poverty combined with the demand for sex services in larger cities by foreign sex tourists and local consumers has created a pipeline for adult and child victims of sex trafficking from all over the country. According to the Indonesian Ministry of Social Affairs reports that there were 56,000 children being sold for sex throughout all 34 Indonesian provinces in 2016.

Helping Combat Sex Trafficking

According to the Australian Federal Police, Indonesia has “eclipsed Thailand, the Philippines and Malaysia to become the number one destination for Australian sex tourists.” UNICEF’s End Child Exploitation Campaign estimates that children make up approximately 30 percent of the individuals performing commercial sex work in Indonesia. This enormous injustice cannot be solved by any single organization. Instead, ending child sex slavery in Indonesia requires committed support of local abolitionists across the country and a functioning network of focused activists. We believe that the tourists who comprise so much of Indonesia’s economy have a role to play through their advocacy, support, and ethical tourism.

Current Developments

COVID project

Project Updates

We are thrilled with the response for our COVID-19 Rapid Response Project. Through the donations of generous people all over the world, we have been able to provide small grants to many partners in our coalition to the victims, potential victims, and survivors that they serve. This on-going project has: * supported victims in 3 red light districts with food and hygiene * provided COVID-19 testing to survivors entering aftercare and staff * secured necessary quarantine for incoming safehouse residents * given emergency food aid to girls at high risk of being trafficked * brought health care access to sex workers and sex trafficking victims during lockdown * created avenues for organization staff to build long-term relationships with women and girls in brothels and

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Blog

How Anti-Human Trafficking Efforts Work (1)

Sex Trafficking as a Capitalist System: Part 1

Put in economic terms, sex trafficking is a supply chain with a supply side and a demand side. The two parts of the supply side are the product (sexual services) and wholesalers (traffickers involved in recruitment and transfer). Retailers (traffickers involved in sales such as brothel employees, pimps etc.) and customers (those that pay for sex) make up the demand side

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